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CBT Outcome Studies
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) has been demonstrated in hundreds of studies to be an effective treatment for a variety of disorders and problems for adults, older adults, children and adolescents. Below is a list of disorders for which CBT is effective, followed by sources.

ADULTS

CBT has been clinically demonstrated through randomized controlled trials to be an effective treatment for the following disorders and problems:

Depression

  • Geriatric Depression
  • Relapse Prevention

Anxiety

  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder
  • Panic Disorder
  • Agoraphobia and Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia
  • Social Anxiety / Social Phobia
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (Trauma)
  • Withdrawal from Anti-Anxiety Medications
  • Dental Phobia

Bipolar Disorder

(in combination with medication)

Eating Disorders

  • Binge-eating disorder
  • Bulimia
  • Anorexia

Body Dysmorphic Disorder

(extreme dissatisfaction with body image)

Somatization Disorder Substance Abuse

  • Cocaine abuse (CBT relapse prevention is effective)
  • Opiate Dependence
  • Smoking Cessation (Group CBT is effective, as well as CBT that has multiple treatment components, in combination with relapse prevention)

Gambling

(in combination with medication)

Marital discord
Anger
Borderline Personality Disorder
Atypical sexual practices/sex offenders
Seasonal Affective Disorder

Medically related disorders:

  • Chronic pain (CBT, in combination with physical therapy, is effective for chronic pain in many medical conditions)
  • Chronic back pain
  • Fatigue and functional impairments among cancer survivors
  • Sickle cell disease pain (CBT that has multiple treatment components is effective)
  • Physical complaints not explained by a medical condition (Somatoform disorders)
  • Somatization Disorder
  • Irritable-bowel syndrome
  • Obesity (CBT is effective in combination with hypnosis)
  • Asthma with Coexisting Panic Disorder (in combination with asthma education)
  • Rheumatic disease pain (CBT that has multiple treatment components is effective)
  • Temporomandibular Disorder pain
  • Erectile dysfunction (CBT is effective for reducing sexual anxiety and improving communication)
  • Infertility (anovulation)
  • Sleep disorders
  • Geriatric sleep disorders
  • Insomnia
  • Vulvodynia (a chronic pain condition of the vulva)
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome
  • Pre-menstrual syndrome

INITIAL STUDIES

CBT has been clinically demonstrated to be an effective treatment in case series, same-investigator studies, or studies without a control group for the following problems and disorders (among adults unless otherwise noted):

  • Geriatric Anxiety
  • Schizophrenia (in combination with medication)
  • Dissociative Disorders
  • Suicide attempts
  • Substance/alcohol abuse
  • Attention deficit disorder
  • Caregiver distress
  • Habit disorders

  Medically related disorders:

  • Migraine headaches
  • Non-cardiac chest pain
  • Cancer pain
  • Pain relating to a disease that has no known cause (Idiopathic pain)
  • Hypochondriasis, or the unsubstantiated belief that one has a serious medical condition
  • Chronic pain (among children/adolescents)
  • Hypertension (CBT is effective as an adjunctive treatment)
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Colitis
  • Gulf War Syndrome
  • Tinnitus

CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

CBT has been clinically demonstrated in randomized controlled trials to be an effective treatment for the following disorders and problems:

  • Separation anxiety
  • Avoidant disorder
  • Overanxious disorder
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder
  • Phobias
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Conduct disorder (oppositional defiant disorder)
  • Distress due to medical procedures (mainly for cancer)
  • Recurrent abdominal pain
  • Physical complaints not explained by a medical condition (Somatoform disorders)

  COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY IS ALSO USED FOR:

  • Stress
  • Low self-esteem
  • Relationship difficulties
  • Group therapy
  • Family therapy
  • Psychiatric Inpatients
  • Work problems & procrastination
  • Separation and Divorce
  • Grief and loss
  • Aging

Main Sources:

Butler, A.C., Chapman, J.E., Forman, E.M., & Beck, A.T. (2006). The empirical status of cognitive-behavioral therapy: A review of meta-analyses. Clinical Psychology Review, 26(1), 17-31.

Chambless, D.L., & Ollendick, T. H. (2001). Empirically Supported Psychological Interventions: Controversies and Evidence. Annu. Rev. Psychol, 52, 685-716.

Studies

Item Name Posted By Date Posted
CBT Outcome Studies PDF (263.72 KB) Administration 11/25/2016